Fresh Salmon, Leek and Vegetables Tarte Tatin – Grain and Dairy Free

Salmon, leek, sweet potatoes and carrots upside down tray bake is a great way to use fresh salmon belly off-cuts. When I buy large fillets, to make home-cured salmon, low belly parts are usually extremely rich in fat. You can hardly use them even for pasta sauces. But this cut is simply perfect for being baked with plenty of cooked or semi-cooked vegetables. It was time to get these off-cuts from the freezer and use them, this time in upside down bake or savoury tart tatin.

I bake savoury chicken tart tatin on regular  basis, using different mix of vegetables with the same dough I bake easy bread.  This time, however, I decided to use another bread dough, with Sunflour as dry ingredient. The dough, based on Sunflour, is even easier to make, without grinding pumpkin seeds or sunflower kernels. Just whisk eggs, add apple puree,  oil, add the mixture of dry ingredients, and the dough is ready to be baked as bread rolls, loaf bread, or used for baking pies or pastries. Tray baking upside down allows to use fresh, uncooked fish with the layer of semi-cooked vegetables. This type of baking gives bread dough layer extra advantage to raise and reach soft and airy texture. It also excludes any chance of the dough to be under-baked.

I made some preliminary calculations and thought that 1.5 portion of the dough would be enough for 1 square (23 cm x 23 cm) bake and one bake in regular size bread pan.

However, I panicked and used all the dough for the square bake. I made 1/2 portion of easy bread dough with ground pumpkin seeds and almond meal (whatever I had in my cupboard already ground) and used it in half-size bread tin for the second bake. As the result, dough layer in both baked products was too thick. My original calculations were correct and 1.5 portion (in recipe below) would be enough to cover the filling for both bakes, in square and regular loaf tins.

Ingredients:

sunflour dough

  • 165g sunflour meal
  • 60g ground golden flaxseed
  • 3 large eggs
  • 60g extra virgin olive oil
  • 225g pure apple puree (I used blended apple pie filling)
  • 9g sea salt
  • 9g baking soda
  • 3g cumin powder (garlic powder or any other spice mix can be used)

filling

  • 1 fresh skinless salmon fillet (quantity is flexible)
  • 2 extra large leeks
  • 4 carrots
  • 1 medium size sweet potato
  • 1 table spoon olive oil
  • 1 table spoon coconut oil
  • wrist-full dehydrated grape tomato halves
  • pinch of cumin seeds
  • pinch of caraway seeds
  • sea salt and coarse black pepper for seasoning
  • 1 table spoon garlic, sweet and hot chilli paste, some of it used to season fresh salmon pieces

extra

  • fresh cherry or grape tomatoes, cut in halves
  • fresh coriander to decorate (optional)
  • black and white sesame seeds to decorate (optional)
  • olive oil to brush the top of tart tatin after baking

Preparation:

  • line baking pan/s with baking paper
  • cut fresh or defrosted salmon into 1-1.5 cm cubes
  • add seasoning, I used my own garlic, sweet and hot chilli paste
  • heat the mixture of olive and coconut oil in a deep pan, add cumin and caraway seeds
  • slice leek in semi-circles and gently fry on low heat until translucent
  • season with salt and black pepper in the process
  • peel and grate sweet potatoes and carrots
  • add them to the pan, add dehydrated tomatoes
  • gently fry until carrots are still not fully cooked
  • vegetables will cool down while you prepare the dough
  • whisk eggs until pale and frothy
  • add apple puree, whisk for another 3-4 minutes
  • add oil and mix it in with a whisk
  • in a separate bowl mix all dry ingredients, put them through a sieve if they have lumps, especially baking soda
  • add dry ingredients to wet, combine

  • cut tomatoes in halves, dry the cut on paper towel
  • place tomatoes in a lined tin, cut side down
  • spread salmon pieces evenly

  • apply vegetable mixture in even layer, press the filling down firmly

  • the best way to apply dough is to wet 2 sheets of baking paper, one cut to the size of baking tin, the second – oversized
  • place the piece of dough on a sheet, spread it with wet hands to a square shape, cover with the second sheet of baking paper, also brushed with water
  • spread the dough to the size of the tin, peel baking paper and turn the dough over to cover the filling
  • dough application can be done in portions, it is pliable and it is easy to connect edges and repair any holes
  • level the surface of the dough

  • bake in preheated to 170C fan forced oven for 40-45 minutes
  • let tart tatin rest in a pan for 5 minutes

  • turn it over to a wire rack, lined with baking paper
  • carefully peel baking paper from the sides first, and then from the top

  • brush the surface with olive oil
  • apply coriander leaves and sesame seeds for decoration
  • tart tatin can be served warm or cold

The second bake was done in 20 cm x 10 cm lined tin. The dough was prepared as 1/2 portion of easy bread, with 1 egg and the mixture of ground pumpkin seeds, almond flour and ground golden flax seeds. It was baked under the same conditions for 30 minutes.

Bread layer in both cases was fully baked and had nice springy texture. It’s a pity the layer was too thick to my liking. The filling tasted wonderful, with sweetness coming from caramelised leek and vegetables, balanced by mildly spiced salmon. Tomatoes, re-hydrated by vegetable juices, added extra flavour and texture. Sweet potatoes and carrots were also fully cooked, but not overcooked to completely mashed consistency. Tart tatin looked surprisingly festive. If not for my panicking, that led to extra thick dough layer, this bake would have got 10 out of 10. Let’s hope I will do better next time.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s